Category Archives: Thysanoptera

Frankliniella schultzei (Trybom): common blossom thrips


California Pest Rating Proposal for

Frankliniella schultzei (Trybom): common blossom thrips
Pest Rating: B


Comment Period: CLOSED


*NOTE

You must be registered and logged in to post a comment. If you have registered and have not received the registration confirmation, please contact us at permits[@]cdfa.ca.gov.

Posted by tn

Arorathrips mexicanus (Crawford): a thrips


California Pest Rating Proposal for

Arorathrips mexicanus (Crawford): a thrips
Synonym: Chirothrips mexicanus Crawford
Pest Rating: C


Comment Period: CLOSED


*NOTE

You must be registered and logged in to post a comment. If you have registered and have not received the registration confirmation, please contact us at permits[@]cdfa.ca.gov.

Posted by tn

Sericothrips staphylinus Haliday: Gorse thrips


California Pest Rating Proposal for

Sericothrips staphylinus Haliday: Gorse thrips Thysanoptera: Thripidae
Current Rating: Q
Proposed Rating: D

Comment Period: CLOSED


*NOTE:

You must be registered and logged in to post a comment. If you have registered and have not received the registration confirmation, please contact us at permits[@]cdfa.ca.gov.

Posted by ka

Thrips | Trichromothrips priesneri (Bhatti)

California Pest Rating  for
Thrips | Trichromothrips priesneri (Bhatti)
Thysanoptera: Thripidae
Pest Rating: A

 


PEST RATING PROFILE

Initiating Event:   

Trichromothrips priesneri was tentatively reported to be established on the island of Maui, Hawaii (Mound et al., 2017).  It is currently Q-rated, and a permanent pest rating proposal is required to support an official pest rating.

History & Status:

Background:  Adult T. priesneri are bicolored, with a dark brown abdomen and wings and white (with brown markings) thorax and head (Mound et al., 2017).  The size is probably similar to that of other Trichromothrips species: 1-1.5 mm (Nakahara, 1993).  Very little information is available on this species.  In Taiwan, T. priesneri has been collected from unidentified grass and Ipomoea nil (Wang, 2008).  In Hawaii, it was found in a coastal, wetland area with dodder and Cyperaceae (Mound et al., 2017).  It is not known if these plants are fed upon by the thrips.  Other species of Trichromothrips have been reported to feed on ferns, bamboo, orchids, and other plants (Goldarazena et al., 2012; Mound and Masumoto, 2004; Ng and Mound, 2015), although again, it is possible that some of these records do not represent feeding but rather plants that the thrips happened to be resting on.  One species of Trichromothrips was reported to be a pest on orchids and various greenhouse plants, but no further information was found to support this (Mound et al., 2016).

Worldwide Distribution:  Trichromothrips priesneri is found in, and is presumably native to India (Karnataka, Madhya Pradesh, Tamil Nadu, and Uttar Pradesh states) (Rachana and Varatharaja, 2017; Tyagi and Kumar, 2016).  It is also reported from Taiwan and Hawaii; these reports are presumed to represent introductions, although the identification of the Hawaii specimens appears to have been tentative (Mound et al., 2017; Wang, 2008).

Official Control: Trichromothrips priesneri is not known to be under official control anywhere.

California Distribution:  Trichromothrips priesneri is not known to be present in California (Symbiota Collections of Arthropods Network).

California Interceptions:  Trichromothrips priesneri has not been intercepted in California (CDFA Pest and Damage Report Database, 2017).

The risk Trichromothrips priesneri would pose to California is evaluated below.

Consequences of Introduction:

1) Climate/Host Interaction: The areas that priesneri occurs in have a tropical or subtropical climate, suggesting that this species requires such climates. This is expected to limit the potential distribution of this species in California to a limited area.  Not enough is known about the feeding habits of T. priesneri to consider the presence of host plants in the potential distribution of this species in California.  Therefore, T. priesneri receives a Medium (2) in this category.

– Low (1) Not likely to establish in California; or likely to establish in very limited areas.

– Medium (2) may be able to establish in a larger but limited part of California.

– High (3) likely to establish a widespread distribution in California.

2) Known Pest Host Range: Although the collection of specimens in Taiwan from grass and Ipomoea nil suggests that these may be host plants, too little is known about the biology of priesneri to assess its host range. To account for uncertainty, the host range will be assumed to be moderate.  Therefore, T. priesneri receives a Medium (2) in this category.

– Low (1) has a very limited host range.

– Medium (2) has a moderate host range.

– High (3) has a wide host range.

3) Pest Reproductive and Dispersal Potential: Trichromothrips priesneri has wings and presumably flies.  Therefore, it receives a Medium (2) in this category.

– Low (1) does not have high reproductive or dispersal potential.

– Medium (2) has either high reproductive or dispersal potential.

– High (3) has both high reproduction and dispersal potential.

4) Economic Impact: Little is known about the biology of priesneri, but it presumably feeds on living plants.  At least one species of Trichromothrips is reported to be a pest.  It is possible that T. priesneri could become a pest if it became established in California.  If this happened, lower crop yields and increased crop production costs could result.  Therefore, it receives a Medium (2) in this category.

Economic Impact:  A, B

A. The pest could lower crop yield.

 B. The pest could lower crop value (includes increasing crop production costs).

C. The pest could trigger the loss of markets (includes quarantines).

D. The pest could negatively change normal cultural practices.

E. The pest can vector, or is vectored, by another pestiferous organism.

F. The organism is injurious or poisonous to agriculturally important animals.

G. The organism can interfere with the delivery or supply of water for agricultural uses.

Economic Impact Score: 2

– Low (1) causes 0 or 1 of these impacts.

– Medium (2) causes 2 of these impacts.

– High (3) causes 3 or more of these impacts.

5) Environmental Impact: If priesneri became established in California and it became a pest, this could result in official or private treatment programs. Therefore, it receives a Medium (2) in this category.

Evaluate the environmental impact of the pest on California using the criteria below.

Environmental Impact:  D

A. The pest could have a significant environmental impact such as lowering biodiversity, disrupting natural communities, or changing ecosystem processes.

B. The pest could directly affect threatened or endangered species.

C. The pest could impact threatened or endangered species by disrupting critical habitats.

D. The pest could trigger additional official or private treatment programs.

E. The pest significantly impacts cultural practices, home/urban gardening or ornamental plantings.

Environmental Impact Score: 2

– Low (1) causes none of the above to occur.

– Medium (2) causes one of the above to occur.

– High (3) causes two or more of the above to occur.

Consequences of Introduction to California for Trichromothrips priesneri: Medium (10)

Add up the total score and include it here.

–Low = 5-8 points

–Medium = 9-12 points

–High = 13-15 points

6) Post Entry Distribution and Survey Information: Trichromothrips priesneri is not known to be present in California.  It receives a Not established (0) in this category.

–Not established (0) Pest never detected in California, or known only from incursions.

–Low (-1) Pest has a localized distribution in California, or is established in one suitable climate/host area (region).

–Medium (-2) Pest is widespread in California but not fully established in the endangered area, or pest established in two contiguous suitable climate/host areas.

–High (-3) Pest has fully established in the endangered area, or pest is reported in more than two contiguous or non-contiguous suitable climate/host areas.

Final Score:

7) The final score is the consequences of introduction score minus the post entry distribution and survey information score: Medium (10)

Uncertainty:

There is a great deal of uncertainty in this proposal.  The biology of T. priesneri is poorly known.  It is not known for certain what plants it feeds on.  The potential of this thrips to cause damage to the plants it feeds on is also not known.  Finally, it is not known how large of an area in California this species could become established in.  It appears to require a tropical or subtropical climate, and this could prevent its establishment in California or limit establishment to a very small area.

Conclusion and Rating Justification:

Trichromothrips priesneri is a thrips that apparently feeds on living plants.  It is not known to occur in California, and it may pose an economic and environmental threat to the state.  For these reasons, a “A” rating is justified.


References:

Goldarazena, A., Gattesco, F., Atencio, R., and Korytowski, C.  2012.  An updated checklist of the Thysanoptera of Panama with comments on host associations.  Check List 8:1232-1247.

Mound, L. and Masumoto, M.  2004.  Trichromothrips veversae sp. n. (Insecta, Thysanoptera), and the Botanical Significance of Insects Host-specific to Austral Bracken Fern (Pteridium esculentum).  Proceedings of the Linnaean Society of New South Wales 125:67-71.

Mound, L. A., Matsunaga, J. N., Bushe, B., Hoddle, M. S., and Wells, A.  2017.  Adventive Thysanoptera species in the Hawaiian Islands: New records and putative host associations.  Proceedings of the Hawaiian Entomological Society 49:17-28.

Mound, L., Nakahara, S., and Tsuda, D. M.  2016.  Thysanoptera-Terebrantia of the Hawaiian Islands: an identification manual.  ZooKeys 549:71-126.

Nakahara, S.  1993.  The genus Dorcadothrips (Thysanoptera: Thripidae) in Hawaii and North America with a description of a new species.  Journal of the New York Entomological Society 101:399-409.

Ng, Y. F., and Mound, L. A.  2015.  Species of Thripinae (Thysanoptera) from bamboo in Malaysia, with one new species and six new records.  Zootaxa 3918:492-502.

Rachana, R. and Varatharaja, R.  2017.  Checklist of terebrantian thrips (Insecta: Thysanoptera) recorded from India.  Journal of Threatened Taxa 9:9748-9755.

Symbiota Collections of Arthropods Network.  Accessed March 27, 2017: http://scan1.acis.ufl.edu

Tyagi, K. and Kumar, V.  2016.  Thrips (Insecta: Thysanoptera) of India – An updated checklist.  Halteres 7:64-98.

Wang, C -L.  2008.  A new synonym and two new records for Taiwan of Thripidae related to Trichromatothrips (Thysanoptera).  Zootaxa 1941:67-68.


Author:

Kyle Beucke, 1220 N Street, Room 221, Sacramento, CA, 95814, 916-403-6741; plant.health[@]cdfa.ca.gov.

Responsible Party:

Jason Leathers, 2800 Gateway Oaks, Sacramento CA 95833, (916) 654-1211, plant.health[@]cdfa.ca.gov


Comment Period:* CLOSED

6/26/18 – 8/10/18


*NOTE:

You must be registered and logged in to post a comment.  If you have registered and have not received the registration confirmation, please contact us at plant.health[@]cdfa.ca.gov.


Comment Format:

♦  Comments should refer to the appropriate California Pest Rating Proposal Form subsection(s) being commented on, as shown below.

Example Comment:
Consequences of Introduction:  1. Climate/Host Interaction: [Your comment that relates to “Climate/Host Interaction” here.]

♦  Posted comments will not be able to be viewed immediately.

♦  Comments may not be posted if they:

Contain inappropriate language which is not germane to the pest rating proposal;

Contains defamatory, false, inaccurate, abusive, obscene, pornographic, sexually oriented, threatening, racially offensive, discriminatory or illegal material;

Violates agency regulations prohibiting sexual harassment or other forms of discrimination;

Violates agency regulations prohibiting workplace violence, including threats.

♦  Comments may be edited prior to posting to ensure they are entirely germane.

♦  Posted comments shall be those which have been approved in content and posted to the website to be viewed, not just submitted.


Pest Rating: A

 


Posted by ls 

A Thrips | Coremothrips pallidus Hood

California Pest Rating for
Coremothrips pallidus Hood: a thrips
Thysanoptera: Thripidae
Pest Rating: A

 


PEST RATING PROFILE
Initiating Event:

Coremothrips pallidus was recently reported to be established in Hawaii (Mound et al., 2017).  It is currently Q-rated, and a permanent pest rating proposal is required to support an official pest rating.

History & Status:

Background:  Coremothrips pallidus is a tiny (~1 mm in length), pale yellowish-white thrips (Hood, 1925).  It has been found feeding on avocado leaves in Hawaii (Mound et al., 2017).  Adults and larvae were found on Guettarda scabra (Rubiaceae) in Guadeloupe, which suggests that this plant was being fed upon (Etienne et al., 2015).  It has also been found on leaves of other plants in the families Bixaceae, Combretaceae, Sterculiaceae, and Ulmaceae, but it is not known if these records represent feeding (Cavalleri, 2015; Etienne et al., 2015; Goldarazena et al., 2012; Hood, 1925).

Worldwide Distribution:  Coremothrips pallidus has been reported from Central America (Panama), South America (Brazil), and the Caribbean (Guadeloupe, Saint Vincent, and Trinidad) (Cavalleri, 2005; Etienne et al., 2015; Monteiro, 2002; Symbiota Collections of Arthropods Network).  It was recently reported to be established on the islands of Hawaii and Oahu in Hawaii (Mound et al., 2017).

Official Control: Coremothrips pallidus is not known to be under official control anywhere.

California Distribution:  Coremothrips pallidus is not known to be present in California.

California Interceptions:  Coremothrips pallidus has not been intercepted in California.

The risk Coremothrips pallidus would pose to California is evaluated below.

Consequences of Introduction:

1) Climate/Host Interaction: Coremothrips pallidus appears to feed on at least two species of plants, including avocado. Avocado is widely planted in southern California.  However, this thrips is apparently restricted to tropical or subtropical areas.  It is possible that it could become established in a limited portion of California.  Therefore, Coremothrips pallidus receives a Medium (2) in this category.

– Low (1) Not likely to establish in California; or likely to establish in very limited areas.

– Medium (2) may be able to establish in a larger but limited part of California.

– High (3) likely to establish a widespread distribution in California.

2) Known Pest Host Range: Although pallidus has been reported from several plants species, only two of these plants are considered verified hosts here: Avocado (because the report specified that feeding had occurred) and Guettarda scabra (because adults and larvae were found on this plant), representing two families. It is likely that some of the other plants in the families listed above (under Background) were also fed upon.  Therefore, C. pallidus receives a Medium (2) in this category.

– Low (1) has a very limited host range.

– Medium (2) has a moderate host range.

– High (3) has a wide host range.

3) Pest Dispersal Potential: Coremothrips pallidus has wings and presumably flies.  It could also be dispersed artificially via transport of infested plant material.  Lastly, it may be capable of wind-aided dispersal.  Therefore, it receives a Medium (2) in this category.

– Low (1) does not have high reproductive or dispersal potential.

– Medium (2) has either high reproductive or dispersal potential.

– High (3) has both high reproduction and dispersal potential.

4) Economic Impact: Coremothrips pallidus has been reported to feed on avocado, which is an important crop in California.  If this species was established in California, it is possible that it could lower the value of avocados.  Therefore, it receives a Low (1) in this category.

Economic Impact: B

A. The pest could lower crop yield.

B. The pest could lower crop value (includes increasing crop production costs).

C. The pest could trigger the loss of markets (includes quarantines).

D. The pest could negatively change normal cultural practices.

E. The pest can vector, or is vectored, by another pestiferous organism.

F. The organism is injurious or poisonous to agriculturally important animals.

G. The organism can interfere with the delivery or supply of water for agricultural uses.

Economic Impact Score: 1

– Low (1) causes 0 or 1 of these impacts.

– Medium (2) causes 2 of these impacts.

– High (3) causes 3 or more of these impacts.

5) Environmental Impact: Coremothrips pallidus feeds on plants in at least two families. If this species became established in California, it would encounter plants that are not present in the area of its current distribution.  If it fed on these plants, it is possible that this thrips could have an impact on natural communities.    Therefore, it receives a Medium (2) in this category.

Evaluate the environmental impact of the pest on California using the criteria below.

Environmental Impact: A

A. The pest could have a significant environmental impact such as lowering biodiversity, disrupting natural communities, or changing ecosystem processes.

B. The pest could directly affect threatened or endangered species.

C. The pest could impact threatened or endangered species by disrupting critical habitats.

D. The pest could trigger additional official or private treatment programs.

E. The pest significantly impacts cultural practices, home/urban gardening or ornamental plantings.

Score the pest for Environmental Impact. Score:

Environmental Impact Score: 2

– Low (1) causes none of the above to occur.

– Medium (2) causes one of the above to occur.

– High (3) causes two or more of the above to occur.

Consequences of Introduction to California for Coremothrips pallidus: Medium (9)

Add up the total score and include it here.

–Low = 5-8 points

–Medium = 9-12 points

–High = 13-15 points

6) Post Entry Distribution and Survey Information: Coremothrips pallidus is not known to occur in California.  It receives a Not established (0) in this category.

–Not established (0) Pest never detected in California, or known only from incursions.

–Low (-1) Pest has a localized distribution in California, or is established in one suitable climate/host area (region).

–Medium (-2) Pest is widespread in California but not fully established in the endangered area, or pest established in two contiguous suitable climate/host areas.

–High (-3) Pest has fully established in the endangered area, or pest is reported in more than two contiguous or non-contiguous suitable climate/host areas.

Final Score:

7) The final score is the consequences of introduction score minus the post entry distribution and survey information score: Medium (9)

Uncertainty:

Coremothrips pallidus is fairly widely distributed, and yet there do not appear to be any reports of this species being a pest.  It is therefore possible that this proposal is overly pessimistic and this thrips may not become a problem even if it was established in California. Some thrips are vectors of plant viruses, and it is possible (though no reports were found of C. pallidus vectoring diseases) that this species could transmit virus diseases of avocado if it was established in California.

Conclusion and Rating Justification:

Coremothrips pallidus is a plant-feeding thrips that attacks avocado and is not known to be present in California.  If it became established in this state, it could impact avocado cultivation and could also have environmental impacts.  For these reasons, an “A” rating is justified.


References:

Cavalleri, A.  2005.  Comunidades de tripes (Insecta: Thysanoptera) em flores e ramos, com ênfase em Asteraceae, no Parque Estadual de Itapuã, Vlamão, RS.  Ph.D. dissertation.  Instituto de Biociências da Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre.

Etienne, J., Ryckewaert, P., and B. Michel.  2015.  Thrips (Insecta: Thysanoptera) of Guadeloupe and Martinique: Updated check-list with new information on their ecology and natural enemies.  Florida Entomologist.  98(1): 298-304.

Goldarazena, A., Gattesco, F., Atencio, R., and C. Korytowski.  2012.  An updated checklist of the Thysanoptera of Panama with comments on host associations.  Check List.  8(6): 1232-1247.

Hood, J.D.  1925.  New neotropical Thysanoptera collected by C.B. Williams.  1925.  Psyche.  32: 48-69.

Monteiro, R.  2002.  The Thysanoptera fauna of Brazil.  Pages 325-340 in R. Marullo and L. Mound, editors.  Thrips and Tospoviruses: Proceedings of the 7th International Symposium on Thysanoptera.  Australian National Insect Collection, Canberra.  390 pp.

Mound, L.A., Matsunaga, J.N., Bushe, B., Hoddle, M.S., and A. Wells.  2017.  Adventive Thysanoptera species in the Hawaiian Islands: New records and putative host associations.  Proceedings of the Hawaiian Entomological Society.  49: 17-28.

Symbiota Collections of Arthropods Network.  Accessed 13 November 2017.  http://scan1.acis.ufl.edu


Author:

Kyle Beucke, 1220 N Street, Room 221, Sacramento, CA, 95814, 916-403-6741; plant.health[@]cdfa.ca.gov.

Responsible Party:

Jason Leathers, 2800 Gateway Oaks, Sacramento CA 95833, (916) 654-1211, plant.health[@]cdfa.ca.gov


Comment Period:* CLOSED

4/30/18 – 6/14/18


*NOTE:

You must be registered and logged in to post a comment.  If you have registered and have not received the registration confirmation, please contact us at plant.health[@]cdfa.ca.gov.


Comment Format:

♦  Comments should refer to the appropriate California Pest Rating Proposal Form subsection(s) being commented on, as shown below.

Example Comment:
Consequences of Introduction:  1. Climate/Host Interaction: [Your comment that relates to “Climate/Host Interaction” here.]

♦  Posted comments will not be able to be viewed immediately.

♦  Comments may not be posted if they:

Contain inappropriate language which is not germane to the pest rating proposal;

Contains defamatory, false, inaccurate, abusive, obscene, pornographic, sexually oriented, threatening, racially offensive, discriminatory or illegal material;

Violates agency regulations prohibiting sexual harassment or other forms of discrimination;

Violates agency regulations prohibiting workplace violence, including threats.

♦  Comments may be edited prior to posting to ensure they are entirely germane.

♦  Posted comments shall be those which have been approved in content and posted to the website to be viewed, not just submitted.


Pest Rating: A

 


Posted by ls 

Thrips | Indusiothrips seshadrii Priesner

California Pest Rating  for
Indusiothrips seshadrii Priesner: thrips
Thysanoptera: Thripidae
Pest Rating: A

 


PEST RATING PROFILE
Initiating Event:

A specimen of Indusiothrips seshadrii was recently found on Oahu Island, Hawaii (Mound et al., 2017).  It is currently Q-rated, and a permanent pest rating proposal is required to support an official pest rating.

History & Status:

Background:  Indusiothrips seshadrii is a small (~1 mm in length), whitish-yellow thrips (Priesner, 1952).  It has been reported from unidentified ferns in India and Hawaii (Mound et al., 2017; Priesner, 1952).  This species appears to be rarely collected, and little additional information is available regarding its biology.

Worldwide Distribution:  Indusiothrips seshadrii is known from, and is presumed native to India and Malaysia (Kudô, 1992; Priesner, 1952).  It has been introduced to Oahu, Hawaii (Mound et al., 2017).

Official Control: Indusiothrips seshadrii is not known to be under official control anywhere.

California Distribution:  Indusiothrips seshadrii is not known to occur in California.

California Interceptions:  Indusiothrips seshadrii has not been intercepted in California.

The risk Indusiothrips seshadrii would pose to California is evaluated below.

Consequences of Introduction:

1) Climate/Host Interaction: Although seshadrii is presumed to feed on ferns, the species it feeds on are not known. California has many species of native ferns, and it is possible that I. seshadrii could find suitable host plants over much of the state.  However, this thrips is currently known to be limited to areas with a tropical climate.  For this reason, I. seshadrii is not expected to be capable of establishing over more than a very limited area.  Therefore, Indusiothrips seshadrii receives a Low (1) in this category.

– Low (1) Not likely to establish in California; or likely to establish in very limited areas.

– Medium (2) may be able to establish in a larger but limited part of California.

– High (3) likely to establish a widespread distribution in California.

2) Known Pest Host Range: Indusiothrips seshadrii may feed on ferns. However, it is not known what species in particular act as hosts.  The fact that it is known from India, Malaysia, and Hawaii suggests that more than a single species of fern is involved.  To incorporate this uncertainty, host range will be considered to be moderate.  Therefore, it receives a Medium (2) in this category.

– Low (1) has a very limited host range.

– Medium (2) has a moderate host range.

– High (3) has a wide host range.

3) Pest Dispersal Potential: This species has wings and presumably flies (Priesner, 1952).  Therefore, it receives a Medium (2) in this category.

– Low (1) does not have high reproductive or dispersal potential.

– Medium (2) has either high reproductive or dispersal potential.

– High (3) has both high reproduction and dispersal potential.

4) Economic Impact: Indusiothrips seshadrii is presumed to feed on ferns.  It has not been reported to be a pest, and it does not appear to pose an economic threat to California.  Therefore, it receives a Low (1) in this category.

Economic Impact:

A. The pest could lower crop yield.

B. The pest could lower crop value (includes increasing crop production costs).

C. The pest could trigger the loss of markets (includes quarantines).

D. The pest could negatively change normal cultural practices.

E. The pest can vector, or is vectored, by another pestiferous organism.

F. The organism is injurious or poisonous to agriculturally important animals.

G. The organism can interfere with the delivery or supply of water for agricultural uses.

Economic Impact Score: 1

– Low (1) causes 0 or 1 of these impacts.

– Medium (2) causes 2 of these impacts.

– High (3) causes 3 or more of these impacts.

5) Environmental Impact: Indusiothrips seshadrii is presumed to feed on ferns. No reports were found indicating the extent, if any, of damage inflicted by these thrips on ferns.  However, this could simply be because the host plants are not economically significant.  There are many rare, native ferns in California.  If this thrips became established in California, it could feed on and impact our native ferns.  Therefore, it receives a Medium (2) in this category.

Evaluate the environmental impact of the pest on California using the criteria below.

Environmental Impact:  B

A. The pest could have a significant environmental impact such as lowering biodiversity, disrupting natural communities, or changing ecosystem processes.

B. The pest could directly affect threatened or endangered species.

C. The pest could impact threatened or endangered species by disrupting critical habitats.

D. The pest could trigger additional official or private treatment programs.

E. The pest significantly impacts cultural practices, home/urban gardening or ornamental plantings.

Score the pest for Environmental Impact. Score:

Environmental Impact Score: 2

– Low (1) causes none of the above to occur.

– Medium (2) causes one of the above to occur.

– High (3) causes two or more of the above to occur.

Consequences of Introduction to California for Indusiothrips seshadrii: Low (8)

Add up the total score and include it here.

–Low = 5-8 points

–Medium = 9-12 points

–High = 13-15 points

6) Post Entry Distribution and Survey Information: Indusiothrips seshadrii is not known to occur in California.  It receives a Not established (0) in this category.

–Not established (0) Pest never detected in California, or known only from incursions.

–Low (-1) Pest has a localized distribution in California, or is established in one suitable climate/host area (region).

–Medium (-2) Pest is widespread in California but not fully established in the endangered area, or pest established in two contiguous suitable climate/host areas.

–High (-3) Pest has fully established in the endangered area, or pest is reported in more than two contiguous or non-contiguous suitable climate/host areas.

Final Score:

7) The final score is the consequences of introduction score minus the post entry distribution and survey information score: Low (8)

Uncertainty:

No reports were found indicating that I. seshadrii has any economic or environmental impact, although this could simply reflect a lack of study of the biology of this species because it does not feed on economically-significant plants.  It is possible that I. seshadrii may not be capable of becoming established in California because it requires a tropical climate.

Conclusion and Rating Justification:

Indusiothrips seshadrii is a thrips that apparently feeds on ferns and is not known to be present in California.  It poses a risk to the environment, including rare fern species, of which there are many in California.  For these reasons, an “A” rating is justified.


References:

Kudô, I.  1992.  A new Malaysian thrips with notes on some species of Dendrothripoides and Indusiothrips (Thysanoptera, Thripidae).  Insecta Matsumurana.  47: 91-101.

Mound, L.A., Matsunaga, J.N., Bushe, B., Hoddle, M.S., and A. Wells.  2017.  Adventive Thysanoptera species in the Hawaiian Islands: New records and putative host associations.  Proceedings of the Hawaiian Entomological Society.  49: 17-28.

Priesner, H.  1952.  On some new genera and species of Thysanoptera from the Oriental region.  Indian Journal of Entomology.  13: 183-200.

Symbiota Collections of Arthropods Network.  Accessed 18 December 2017. http://scan1.acis.ufl.edu


Author:

Kyle Beucke, 1220 N Street, Room 221, Sacramento, CA, 95814, 916-403-6741; plant.health[@]cdfa.ca.gov.

Responsible Party:

Jason Leathers, 2800 Gateway Oaks, Sacramento CA 95833, (916) 654-1211, plant.health[@]cdfa.ca.gov


Comment Period:* CLOSED

4/30/18 – 6/14/18


*NOTE:

You must be registered and logged in to post a comment.  If you have registered and have not received the registration confirmation, please contact us at plant.health[@]cdfa.ca.gov.


Comment Format:

♦  Comments should refer to the appropriate California Pest Rating Proposal Form subsection(s) being commented on, as shown below.

Example Comment:
Consequences of Introduction:  1. Climate/Host Interaction: [Your comment that relates to “Climate/Host Interaction” here.]

♦  Posted comments will not be able to be viewed immediately.

♦  Comments may not be posted if they:

Contain inappropriate language which is not germane to the pest rating proposal;

Contains defamatory, false, inaccurate, abusive, obscene, pornographic, sexually oriented, threatening, racially offensive, discriminatory or illegal material;

Violates agency regulations prohibiting sexual harassment or other forms of discrimination;

Violates agency regulations prohibiting workplace violence, including threats.

♦  Comments may be edited prior to posting to ensure they are entirely germane.

♦  Posted comments shall be those which have been approved in content and posted to the website to be viewed, not just submitted.


Pest Rating: A

 


Posted by ls